Category Archives: You Should Be A Prepper

Prepped In A Year: My Kindle Book

rsz_preppedGetting started prepping can be an overwhelming experience.  Moving from totally unprepared to prepared for any disaster requires so much work, organization and planning that you might not know where to start.  And, worst of all, you may put off starting your prepping because it seems like so much to do.

Well, first of all, let’s adjust that way of thinking a bit.  Taking a step, any step, toward a goal is progress.  So don’t be put off by the thought that there is too much to do to get prepped.  Take your first step and you will already be better prepared than if you hadn’t done it.  Then take another step and you’re even further on your way.

But still, you’d be better off if you didn’t take steps randomly.  Your most efficient way of reaching a goal is to set out a plan and make steady and persistent progress on that plan.

When it comes to emergency preparedness, there are four different areas that your plan should include.  First, you should put together a bug-out bag, or 72-hour emergency kit, for each person and pet in your family.  Second, you need an evacuation plan.  Decide on a place to meet your family in the event your home is destroyed, and decide on how to get out of town if you need to.  Third, you will want to set up long-term food storage for a long-term emergency situation.  And, lastly, you will need to learn skills and develop habits that will enable you and your family to meet challenges that you will encounter in a disaster.

The best approach to these four areas is a systematic, month-by-month plan.  And I have written one for you.  It’s called Prepped In A Year: Your 12-Month Guide to Emergency Preparedness.  In it, I take you through a plan for each of these four areas.  By doing a little at a time every month for a year, you will get to the point where you are well prepared for any emergency in twelve months’ time.

You can find my book on Kindle at http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TQIAF98.  Now, if you don’t have a Kindle, you can download the free Kindle reader app and read my book, or any Kindle book, on your PC, tablet or smart phone.  A download link to the Kindle reader app is on the same page as my book, http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00TQIAF98.

I hope that you read my book and, more importantly, put it to use.  Everyone should be a prepper.  A disaster can happen to anyone, no matter where you live, what your economic status, or what your political persuasions are.  A hurricane, a tornado, civil unrest, an economic disaster that can cause long-term unemployment, a failure of the electrical grid, an earthquake, a drought, a flood — the potential threats are endless.

I sincerely hope that all of my readers assess the possibility of a serious threat to their well-being and way of life and that they all prepare to meet the threat by being prepared.  And I hope that my book, Prepped In A Year: Your 12-Month Guide to Emergency Preparedness, will be a valuable companion on that journey.

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Preparedness Essentials: Fire Starters

As part of your emergency preparedness plan, you will need to include fire starters.  To state the obvious, fires produce heat, light and a means to cook food.  All of those things are important in your emergency preparedness plan.

The first thing you should have on hand is a box of waterproof matches.  It’s possible to make your own by covering matches in paraffin and storing them in a watertight container.  I don’t bother to make my own, though.  I purchase them.  There is nothing special to know about using waterproof matches.  Simply strike them on the strike strip as you do for other matches.

You should also have a magnesium fire starter as a back-up.  This tool is made of a block of magnesium with a flint strip and a metal rod.  Use the metal rod to scrape magnesium shavings off onto your kindling.  Then strike the flint strip to make sparks, which will ignite the magnesium.

I recommend having both of these on hand in case you have an issue implementing one of them.  You will also be able to use the matches if you run out of flint in the magnesium fire starter, or use the magnesium fire starter if you run out of matches.

It’s also helpful to have fire starter nuggets on hand.  Nuggets are used instead of kindling as the first, small material that is set on fire when you are building a fire.  They can be used in fireplaces and stoves.  Although not essential for starting a fire, they sure make it easier.

As always, you should be sure that you know how to use your equipment before any emergency takes place.  Try the water proof matches a time or two, just to get familiar.  Using the magnesium fire starter actually takes some skill, so you should definitely practice using it until you can start a fire quickly and easily.

Keep these items in your bug-out bag so that you’ll have them with you when you grab your bag and go.

I can recommend the following products:

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